Month: November 2018

Garda Shoulder Injury Compensation of €8,000 Awarded

A High Court judge has awarded €8,000 compensation to a garda for a soft tissue shoulder injury which he sustained while on duty.

This was far less than the €20,000 personal injury compensation originally sought in the action. Garda Ronan Leonard took the compensation action against the Minister for Public Expenditure and Reform over an injury he sustained while on duty he fell on July 11, 2014, while chasing a suspect.

Garda Leonard went to an out of hours doctor service and, following this, was tended to at an A&E hospital department. During this treatment X-rays were carried out which showed no fractures. He was  sent home with a course of pain-killers and anti-inflammatories. Garda Leonard was absent from work for five days on sick leave before returning.

As he was still suffering with constant pain, on July 21 Garda Leonard went to his family GP for ongoing pain. Here he was diagnosed with a sprain to the joint at the top of his left shoulder and given a steroid injection and anti-inflammatories. This course of treatment was repeated in October 2014.

The court was told that Garda Leonard has now made a full recovery from the soft tissue injury and there was no evidence of him making any previous claim under the Garda Compensation Acts.

Counsel for Garda Leonard argued that he should get €20,000 based on the Book of Quantum. However, the court ruled that the appropriate award was €8000, plus €60 agreed special damages.

The Judge remarked in his ruling that the award should be €8,000 due to the recent binding decisions of the Court of Appeal in relation to personal injury cases. This decision stated that a downwards recalibration of damages in certain personal injury actions of between 45-50 percent must take place.

The judge also said that he felt that €8,000 personal injury compensation was fair to Garda Leonard and proportionate to the injury suffered.

Nursing Home Fatal Accident Compensation of €54,000 Awarded Deceased Woman’s Family

€54,000 fatal injury in a nursing home accident compensation has been awarded to the family of a 90-year-old woman who died as a result of scald injuries she sustained from a burst hot water bottle .

The family, the court was told, were awarded compensation due to the trauma, suffering, funeral and travel expenses in the aftermath of death of their mother and granny at a nursing home in Dublin.

Legal counsel for the family Barrister Frank Crean informed Circuit Court President, Mr Justice Raymond Groarke, that the late Olive Sheeran sustained serious scalding on her buttocks, left thigh and calf, heels and ankles when a hot water bottle burst in the bed that she was sleeping in.

The operators of the Deansgrange-based nursing home, SRCW Limited, had agreed to pay the family €54,406 nursing home injury compensation according to Mr Crean. The Court was told that Ms Carol Hayes, with an address at Corabally, Ardfield, Clonakilty, Co Cork, a daughter of the late Ms Sheeran, had initiated the injury compensation action against SRCW Limited on behalf of herself and her brothers Mark (57) and Conor Sheeran (55) and Ms Sheeran’s grandchildren Adam (18), Jennifer (17), Alexandra (26), and Thomas Sheeran (20) and Peter (28), Matthias (26) and Oisin (23) Hayes.

The court was informed by Ms Hayes through an affidavit that she was asking the court grant approval to the Injuries Board assessment “in respect of the fatal injuries” her mother, then aged 89, had suffered in an accident at Ferndene on January 6, 2017. Ms Hayes told the court that her mother had been residing in the home when the accident that led to her death occurred.

The accident took place when a nurse at the home had attended Ms Sheeran’s room and taken two water bottles away to refill them with fresh water. One of the refilled water bottles was then put next to Ms Sheeran’s feet and burst a little while later, inflicting significant burns on her.

Presiding Judge Groarke was informed that following an investigation all water bottles had been removed from use at the nursing home and the investigator had recommended that they be replaced with coded stock which should be inspected once a month and replaced with new bottles once per year.

Ms Sheeran had been rushed by ambulance to the emergency department of St Vincent’s Hospital where she had been tended to before being brought to the burns unit of St James’s Hospital. Her burns were then been treated with antiseptic dressings, antibiotics and analgesia. However, Ms Sheeran had contracted pneumonia and a urinary tract infection and prescribed a course of intravenous antibiotics. Ms Sheeran died before her wounds had completely healed.

Judge Groarke approved the nursing home accident compensation settlement.