Public Liability Claims by Women Outnumber Claims by Men 2-to-1

According to statistics released by the Injuries Board, public liability claims by women in 2013 outnumbered those made by men by two-to-one.

Public liability claims for compensation are the second-most common category of personal injury claim in Ireland after claims for injuries sustained in motor accidents; and last year more than 1,700 assessments of public liability injury compensation were accepted by people who had suffered injuries in public liability accidents.

The most common type of public liability accident was trips, slips and falls in places of public access – more than two-thirds of the accepted assessments related to accidents such as slips on wet floors, trips over broken pavements and falls due to uneven drains and manholes – while a higher than usual number of injuries were sustained in leisure facilities such as cinemas, sports clubs and hairdressers.

Accidents in shops and supermarkets accounted for a considerable number of public liability compensation settlements and, possibly due to the high number of shopping accidents, the volume of public liability claims by women outstripped those made by men by 71.4 percent -v- 28.6 percent – with the majority of injuries sustained being fractures, cuts and soft tissue injuries such as bruises and strains.

Also possibly due to the high number of injuries sustained in shopping accidents, Saturday was the most common day of the week for accidents in public places for the third consecutive year. The month of July 2013 saw the highest level of accidents throughout the year, while January – surprisingly considering the nature of the weather in January – was the safest month to be out and about.

The total amount of compensation for public liability injuries assessed by the Injuries Board in 2013 amounted to €44 million, with the average accepted assessment being €25,120 – an increase of more than 10 percent on 2012. Despite the number of public liability claims by women being more than double those made by men, men accepted awards slightly higher on average than those for women (€25,664 -v- €24,902).